International Ops 2018

Flight Service Bureau | OPSGROUP

Tag: WSSS

Singapore Changi (WSSS) Departure Clearance by Datalink

Starting April 23rd, 2018, Changi Airport (WSSS) will begin giving departure clearance (DCL) via datalink, on certain routes. The idea is to clear up voice communications when DCL can be used. Full details listed in CAAS AIP SUP 013/2018.

To use this, you’ll need ACARS, and be compliant with EUROCAE ED85-A. You’ll login to the ground system at WSSS.

The departures are as below:

– Destinations in Peninsular Malaysia via ATS Routes A457 and B466
– Destinations in Thailand via ATS Routes B466 and B469 / M751
– Destinations in Indonesia via ATS Route A457, R469 and B470
– Destinations in Australia and New Zealand via ATS Route B470
– Flights with allocated Calculated Take-Off Time (CTOT) under Bay of Bengal Cooperative Air Traffic Flow Management (BOBCAT)

A few other notes:

-The DCL message will not include requested crusing levels and final cruising levels. Your planned flight level in 15b will be used, and ATC will give cruise FL when airborne. Sounds like they won’t entertain any requests for a different FL while on the ground.

-No revisions allowed over datalink, all changes must be made by voice comms.

-Make your request with RCD message (see format in attached AIC) no more than 20 minutes before TOBT. If you’ve got a CTOT under BOBCAT, you’l need to put that in the message. If you’re routing via ANITO B470, list your FL at ANITO crossing.

If your DCL is rejected, you’ll get a “revert to voice procedures” message. A few auto-rejects:
-Flight routes not applicable.
-RCD message doesn’t comply with ED-85A or inaccurate data.
-Invalid TOBT
-When required due to flow restrictions.

Operating out of WSSS soon?  CAAS AIP SUP 013/2018 is worth a read.

PBCS is coming to Singapore

It’s not only the North Atlantic that will be seeing PBCS being implemented on March 29th – on that same date, the weird acronym is coming to Singapore too!

However, the requirements for Singapore airspace are slightly different to that for crossing the NAT.

The short of it – compliant aircraft will be allowed a reduced separation of 50NM (or 10 minutes in trail) on certain airways: L642, M635, M767, M771, M774 and N884. For everyone else, it’ll be 80NM (or 20 minutes in trail). For Singapore, ‘compliant aircraft’ basically means anything with RNP10, CPDLC and ADS-C capable of the RCP240 / RSP180 performance requirement.

You’ll still need to obtain some kind of operator approval from your State of Registry. As we mentioned in our article on PBCS on the NAT – the best way to do that will probably be to submit an AFM Statement of Compliance for PBCS, showing exactly what data link communication systems you aircraft has, along with the selected performance.

For Singapore, if you want to operate on those airways at the reduced separation, here’s what you’ll need to remember to include in your ATC FPL:

In 10a:

In 10b:

In Item 18:
Make sure you include SUR/RSP180 to show you’re capable of the RSP180 performance requirement.

For more info, check out the full AIC published by Singapore here.

Sorry, you gotta go to Seletar: Ops to Singapore

Singapore Changi Airport has been named the best airport in the world by Skytrax for the past four years running.

It already has a butterfly garden, free 24-hour cinema, rooftop swimming pool and spa, but soon it’s going to become even more awesome – work is currently underway on the new ten-storey ‘Jewel Terminal’, scheduled for completion in 2018, with a gigantic ‘rain vortex’ waterfall cascading from the ceiling, indoor rainforest park, playgrounds, shopping mall and hotel complex. If it ends up looking anything like the pictures in the brochure, it will be pretty spectacular…

Unfortunately, if you’re operating a business jet to Singapore, you probably won’t be allowed to go there!

The Singapore authorities will not allow overnight parking at Changi for charter flights under any circumstances, and parking for private flights is limited to a maximum of 48 hours. Slots are required, and with the amount of scheduled traffic currently in place, unless you’re planning to do a really quick turn at super off-peak times (ie. the middle of the night), your request will probably be denied.

This is where the authorities would like all corporate flights to go instead:

Seletar Airport. Doesn’t look quite as fantastic, does it?

The good news is that unlike Changi, at Seletar there is much less congestion, no parking time limits, and much lower handling costs. However, it does only have a 6024 ft runway and is not due to have ILS installed until some time next year. Added to that, fuel is around $1 per US gallon more expensive than at Changi.

Whether you end up going to Changi or Seletar, if you’re operating as a non-scheduled commercial flight you’re going to need a landing permit, which means you’re going to have to jump through a few hoops.
Here’s a quick breakdown of how to organise that non-sked flight:

Step 1: Get an ‘Operations Permit’ (OP)

You will need to open an ATLAS Account with CAAS and then log in to appoint a handling agent. Then either you or the handling agent will be able to liaise with the authorities to obtain the Operations Permit (OP).

This is basically a blanket approval for that operator to conduct revenue flights to Singapore, and you may have up to 20 aircraft on this permit.

Once this permit is approved, CAAS will advise the validity period which may be up to one year, although the OP will only remain valid for as long as the other aircraft documents are valid for. The OP usually takes 3 working days for approval by CAAS if all paperwork submitted is in order.

 

Step 2: Get an ‘Air Transport Permit’ (AT)

After securing the OP, it means CAAS have in principle approved you as an operator to carry out charter flights to Singapore.

With the OP in place, you can then apply for an Air Transport Permit (AT) which is required for every individual charter schedule into Singapore (WSSS or WSSL). The AT Permit for WSSS usually takes around 3-5 working days for approval by CAAS, although they will often reject your request and demand that you operate to WSSL instead. The AT Permit for WSSL usually takes around 3 working days for approval.

For the OP and AT permits, you should register an account here:
https://appserver1.caas.gov.sg/ATLAS/welcome.do

 

Step 3: Slots –  but only if you’re going to Changi!

Remember, slots are only required at Changi, and not at Seletar. You can only obtain slots after you’ve obtained an OP and an AT. Slots will likely take several hours to obtain, and available slot times may differ from what you’ve requested, due to other scheduled traffic. You can only submit requests for slots a maximum of 7 days prior to ops, and a minimum of 24 hours prior. And you will nearly always need to change your schedule in order to match available slot options!

For more information than you could ever possibly need about slot requests at Changi, check the Singapore AIC 2/13:
http://www.caas.gov.sg/caasWeb2010/export/sites/caas/en/Regulations/Aeronautical_Information/AIC/AIC_PDFs/2-13.pdf

For requesting Changi airport slots, if you already have an account then you should use the online system:
https://www.online-coordination.com

Or if you don’t have an account then just send an email with your request in the standard SCR format to:
csc@changiairport.com


 

Other things to consider…

  • If you’re operating as a private flight to Singapore (instead of non-scheduled commercial), life suddenly gets considerably easier, as permits are not required for private flights! Just make sure you have parking arranged, and file your inbound ATC flight plan 12 hours in advance, being sure to copy in the Singapore ATC AFTN address WSJCZQZX. You’ll still need slots if operating to Changi, but at least you don’t have the added hassle of having to obtain the OP/AT.
  • Permits are not required for Singapore overflights either. The only exception to this is for special airworthiness flights, where for both overflights and landings you basically follow same process – apply for a Singapore Permit To Fly. To do that, complete the form at the following link: http://www.caas.gov.sg/caasWeb2010/export/sites/caas/en/PDF_Documents/Others/aw101.doc
  • It’s also worth noting that in the Singapore FIR, ADS-B is now mandatory for aircraft wishing to fly at or above FL290.

 

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