International Ops 2017

Flight Service Bureau | OPSGROUP

Tag: BGBW

Greenbacks and Greenland – $3000 to file as an alternate

Trans-atlantic operators who have been putting RALT/BGBW on their flight plans have been receiving hefty invoices post-flight.

BGBW/Narsarsuaq is a popular airport to use in flight planning as an emergency divert and for ETOPS, as it’s perfectly positioned right in the middle of the big empty chunk of nothing that exists between the east coast of Canada and Iceland.

BGBW is open Mon-Sat 11-20z (8am-5pm local time). It’s completely closed on Sundays and on holidays.

So if you file a flight plan with RALT/BGBW from Mon-Sat 11-20z, you won’t get charged.

But outside these hours, you will get charged. It gets slightly complicated here: the charges in the box below apply when they stay open for you to use as an ETOPS alternate at any time that they are closed, but there’s an extra 10% charge on top of that for any time they are closed and fast asleep in bed, which is between 00-08z (9pm-5am local time). Got it?

Important to note: these get charged even if you don’t actually divert to BGBW. To save you from having to Google it yourself, 15,870 Danish Krone equates to $2485 USD!

If you want BGBW to stay open for you to use as an ETOPS alternate, you need to put RALT/BGBW in your flight plan – they’ll see it, and will stay open for at the times you need. But bear in mind that if they’re closed already at the time you file your flight plan, they won’t see it! So they prefer you to do it properly and arrange everything in advance by email.

If you get an invoice from a company called Global Aviation Data A/S, unfortunately it’s not a scam email – they are the guys who work with Greenland Airports to collect the monies owed when operators request airports like BGBW to stay open for them.

Cheapest Jet fuel on the Atlantic? $1.15 a gallon

The cost of a gallon of Jet A1 has been rather unstable lately. Over the last couple of years, we’ve produced several versions of our  North Atlantic Plotting Chart, and as we’ve done so, the price of Jet A1 has dropped each time across the Atlantic seaboard.

So, where is cheapest? Answer: Keflavik. $1.15 for a gallon of Jet A1 at the best available commercial airline rate. Now, that was six weeks back or so, when we did the research for the chart, and prices have been rising since (tracking the Oil price pretty well).

BIKF

Next best on the list is Shannon, Ireland – $1.37 USD/USG, thanks to the Shannon Free Zone, which strips out most of the taxes that the EU levies as standard.

Next question, then: most expensive? Narsarsuaq, at $5.65 for a gallon. Why so much more? Primary reason: getting the fuel to BGBW is an awful lot harder than getting it to BIKF. The rest is down to the difference in government tax policy.

Fuel price is of course not the only tech stop or diversion consideration on the North Atlantic, but given that security, safety, and service quality is pretty much equal across the entire NAT region, it’s an important factor – along with the cost of handling.

If you look at the snapshot above, you can see that your G550 will cost around $1685 including Airport Fees; taking a B787 to KEF will run around $4300 all in.

The North Atlantic Plotting Chart has all this information for all the common North Atlantic ETOPS/Diversion Fields – namely: CYYT/St Johns, CYQX/Gander, CYJT/Stephenville, CYYR/Goose Bay, CYFB/Iqaluit, BGSF/Sondrestrom, BGBW/Narsarauq, BIKF/Keflavik, EGPF/Glasgow Intl, EGAA/Belfast, EINN/Shannon, and LPLA/Lajes.
Download NAT Plotting Chart

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