International Ops 2017

Flight Service Bureau | OPSGROUP

Month: August 2017 (page 1 of 2)

EUROPE: Third Country Operators (TCO)

A TCO is an authorization issued by EASA to any third-country operator wishing to perform commercial air transport in any of the following European countries:

  • 28 EU Member States
  • Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland

Plus the following territories:

  • Gibraltar, Aland Islands, Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands, Guadeloupe, French Guiana, Martinique, Reunion, Saint-Martin, Mayotte

Applications are made directly to EASA using their application form.

https://www.easa.europa.eu/document-library/application-forms/fotco00160

You will need to provide the following documentation:

  • AOC
  • Operating Specifications
  • Insurance

Contact details for applications are made to:

European Aviation Safety Agency
Applications Handling Department
Postfach 10 12 53
D-50452 Köln
Germany

Fax: +49 (0)221 89990 ext. 4461
E-mail: tco.applications@easa.europa.eu

Should EASA deem the application in order the operating authorization process is completed in approximately 30 days.  Some flights can avoid this requirement, such as Air Ambulance or Humanitarian flights.

Please note:

  • Overflights of the above states do not require a TCO permit.
  • EU member states cannot issue a permit for their country if the operator does not already hold a TCO operating authorization.

If you plan to operate to these areas, we’d suggest getting your TCO right away, even if you don’t have a planned flight at the moment.  They can take some time to obtain.

24AUG: Typhoon Hato, Hurricane Harvey – International Ops Bulletin

Weekly International Ops Bulletin published by FSB for OPSGROUP covering critical changes to Airports, Airspace, ATC, Weather, Safety, Threats, Procedures, Visas. Subscribe to the short free version here, or join thousands of your Pilot/Dispatcher/ATC/CAA/Flight Ops colleagues in OPSGROUP for the full weekly bulletin, airspace warnings, Ops guides, tools, maps, group discussion, Ask-us-Anything, and a ton more! Curious? See what you get. Rated 5 stars by 125 reviews.

ZZZZ/Worldwide One of our primary missions at FSB is to monitor the world’s airspace and report on new risks to civil aviation. When enough changes occur, we update our “Unsafe Airspace Summary“ (PDF download). Last week, we published a new summary effective 16AUG2017 – version “INDIA” … Read the article.

KZZZ/USA Operating under Part 119 and performing operations under part 121 and/or part 135 under the jurisdiction of the FAA? If that’s you then you need to know that you can no longer rely on the FAA to provide flight or engineer examiners. There is a requirement for those organisations operating under this rule part to have a training and checking program. It looks like this requirement hasn’t been enforced in the past. That will be changing. Expect your local inspector to be in touch in the next few weeks.

HAZZ/Ethiopia On 21 August, the opposition Oromo Federalist Congress called for a general strike throughout the Oromo region, which surrounds the capital Addis Ababa, for the next five days. Travelers should expect disruptions to business activities throughout the region during the strike.

KASE/Aspen The FAA recently published a letter to airmen outlining a VFR climb procedure at Colorado’s Aspen/Pitkin County Airport (ASE) that may enable business aircraft crews to avoid delays following suspension of the “Wrap” departure procedure from ASE’s Runway 33 earlier this year. More from NBAA. While ATC will not ask pilots to depart under VFR climb, crews may request the procedure. More here.

OLZZ/Lebanon On Monday Lebanese military forces announced that they had uncovered a cache of anti-aircraft missiles among other arms caches abandoned by militants in Ras Baalbek. The other weapons include anti-personnel mines, mortars and machine guns. There were no reports indicating that the anti-aircraft weapons were connected to any terror plot; rather, they were likely for battlefield use, given that they were seized along with other weapons.

MMZZ/Mexico The US updated its travel warning for Mexico yesterday, warning about the risk of traveling to certain parts of Mexico due to the activities of criminal organizations in those areas. Travelers been the victims of violent crimes, including homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery in various Mexican states.

TXKF/Bermuda radar is out of action Thursday 4-10Z, usual advice – operate above FL320, or avoid the airspace. See Notam KZNY A0231/17 for the details.

BIKF/Keflavik Tower continues to have some staffing issues, keep an eye on their Notams the day of your operation, and consider another NAT fuel stop if needed.

LLZZ/Israel National Holiday Sept 18-19. They shut up shop at 1100 on the 18 Sep, and aren’t back at work until over 32 hours later at 1930 on the 19 Sep. First departure won’t be until 2030. It’s an important religious holiday in Israel. This is in addition to the closure for works on 7 Sep from 1500-1955, and the daily closures and block outs of GA aircraft due congestion. If you are planning a stop in Tel Aviv pick your time carefully. The FIR (LLLL) has the same closure on the 18-19 Sep.

MUCF/Cienfuegos will have no tower controller at 26th – 31st Aug, if you need to operate and require ATC, they say a controller can be arranged with 24 hrs notice.

EGAE/Derry is open again after flooding closed the terminal building on Tuesday night.

LPZZ/Portugal All airports – Immigration officers are planning strike action for 24th and 25th, high potential for delays.

FQZZ/Mozambique Visa on arrival is now available as an exception only. If visas are available from your home country they should be applied for prior to travel.

UUZZ/Russia On 21 August, the U.S. Embassy in Moscow announced that U.S. missions across Russia would suspend non-immigrant visa operations starting on 23 August. These operations will resume on 1 September but on a significantly smaller scale. The U.S. cited Russia’s decision to drastically reduce U.S. diplomatic staff in Russia as the reason for the reduction in non-immigrant visa operations. Beginning 1 September, non-immigrant visa interviews will be conducted in Moscow only.

VVZZ/Vietnam There has been a sharp increase in the number of Dengue fever cases from Vietnam. The only form of prevention for Dengue is to avoid being bitten by mosquitos.

DFZZ/Burkina Faso Updated travel advisory, following the recent terrorist attack on a restaurant in the capital Ouagadougou which killed 19. “Avoid non essential travel due threat of terrorism.” Multiple sources.

PLCH/Christmas Island Fuel is listed as available only for scheduled flights until mid-October due to supply issues.

EGMC/Southend Airport closed overnight between 2200-0500 04-08 Sept for all but scheduled flights.

LDPL/Pula Congestion going on, you’ll need PPR until August 27th.  Email them at operations@airport-pula.hr

ZSXX/China Couple of airports here are publishing daily not to file them as an alternate. So check before filing if you are looking to use any of these airports ZGGG, ZGHA, ZHCC, ZSXZ.

Weekly International Ops Bulletin published by FSB for OPSGROUP covering critical changes to Airports, Airspace, ATC, Weather, Safety, Threats, Procedures, Visas. Subscribe to the short free version here, or join thousands of your Pilot/Dispatcher/ATC/CAA/Flight Ops colleagues in OPSGROUP for the full weekly bulletin, airspace warnings, Ops guides, tools, maps, group discussion, Ask-us-Anything, and a ton more! Curious? See what you get. Rated 5 stars by 125 reviews.

Typhoon Hato affects Hong Kong, Macau, Zhuhai

With the worst of Typhoon Hato now past the Pearl River Delta, some incredible footage has been seen showing the storm in action.

The worst affected airports were VHHH/Hong Kong, VMCC/Macau, and ZGSD/Zhuhai, with winds up to 105 knots.

 

Hato is now tracking away to the west.

The mystery of the missing Russian Weather

A little while ago, Russia stopped sending out METAR and TAF weather updates on the international wires for a whole bunch of airports.

This made life difficult for international operators, especially airlines and business jet operators that use Siberian alternates. If you don’t have the weather reports, you can’t use it.

In OpsGroup, one of our members reported that they now had issues getting weather for places like
UHHH/UHMA/UHMM/UHPP/UIBB/UIII/ULAA/ULLI/UNAA/UNKL/UNNT/USCC/USNN.

Then, another member pointed us at this official site – http://metavia2.ru/index.php?lng=en. But to register, you need to send an email, and nobody got replies.

So, the mystery remains unsolved. What do you know? Comment below, or email us at bulletin@fsbureau.org.

 

 

 

Think twice before entering this airspace. Overflight Risk areas in August 2017.

One of our primary missions at FSB is to monitor the world’s airspace and report on new risks to civil aviation. When enough changes occur, we update our “Unsafe Airspace Summary“.

Today, we published a new summary effective 16AUG2017 – version “INDIA”.

First up, the map as things stand:

Red is Level 1 – Avoid this Airspace
Orange is Level 2 – Assessed Risk
Yellow is Level 3 – Caution.

A live version of this map is always updated at safeairspace.net

 

What’s changed since the last summary?

  • Somalia is downgraded to Level 2, so there are now five Level 1 – Avoid countries: Libya, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, and North Korea.
  • Saudi Arabia is upgraded to Level 2, due to assessed risk in the southwestern portion of the FIR (Yemen border area)
  • French Guyana no longer a threat as strikes and airspace closures have ended
  • Addition of JapanVenezuela and South Korea at Level 3 – Caution advised

If you have ops to any of these countries, make sure to have a read of the risk information. A full library is at safeairspace.net.

 

Download the latest summary

 

10AUG: Is Japanese airspace at risk? New North Korea missile threat to civil aviation – Weekly Ops Bulletin

Weekly International Ops Bulletin published by FSB for OPSGROUP covering critical changes to Airports, Airspace, ATC, Weather, Safety, Threats, Procedures, Visas. Subscribe to the short free version here, or join thousands of your Pilot/Dispatcher/ATC/CAA/Flight Ops colleagues in OPSGROUP for the full weekly bulletin, airspace warnings, Ops guides, tools, maps, group discussion, Ask-us-Anything, and a ton more! Curious? See what you get. Rated 5 stars by 125 reviews.

LEBL/Barcelona Security staff at Barcelona airport have announced Industrial action for Fridays, Sundays and Mondays starting from 4th August, with the following time schedule: 0330-0430, 0830-0930, 1430-1530, 1630-1730 UTC.

HAZZ/Ethiopia The government lifted on Aug. 4 a state of emergency that has been in place since last October, AP reported.

DISP/San Pedro, Ivory Coast is closed for two weeks since August 2 to renovate the runway, which is in urgent need of repair, according to Ivorian authorities. The runway has been renovated in the past; however, past repairs were insufficient to prevent the runway from deteriorating to its current state of disrepair.

KZZZ/USA The eclipse is coming! As the moon moves in front of the sun on August 21st, a “path of totality” will develop in portions of Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and South Carolina. This rare event has created intense demand for airport services in these areas, and operators should expect delays to ground support, parking and possibly even approach sequencing to busier airports. NBAA has published some useful guidance for business operators in the US.

DFFD/Ouagadougou is reporting some capacity issues, and would prefer not to be filed as an alternate until August 19th.

EDDK/Cologne is PPR for non-scheduled traffic, apply 72 hours prior to flight: +49 2203 40 4310, flightinfo@cgn.de.

VTBD/Bangkok On August 7th, authorities stated that they were conducting an investigation into Bangkok’s Don Mueang International Airport (VTBD/DMK) following reports that approximately 5,000 passengers were forced to stand in lines for four to five hours at the facility’s immigration checkpoints. The 4 August incident occurred when several delayed flights resulted in increased passenger traffic at the facility. Heightened security measures in place at the airport — resulting in extended immigration screening — exacerbated the security processing delay. Several passengers required medical attention due to poor ventilation in the immigration checkpoint area and lack of available food or water. An airport official stated that the facility would open more immigration counters in response to the incident, which will allow authorities to process at least 1,800 visitors per hour.

YZZZ/Australia Further details have emerged about the foiled attack targeting commercial aviation in Australia, which authorities first revealed on July 30. An Australian Federal Police (AFP) official stated that two Lebanese-Australian nationals plotted to place an improvised explosive device (IED) on an Etihad Airways flight departing Sydney Airport (YSSY/SYD) on 15 July. One of the suspects brought the luggage containing the IED to the airport but then left before reaching the check-in counter. Officials have not yet established why he abandoned the attempt. The man intended to give the luggage to his brother, who boarded the aircraft. Officials stated, however, that the passenger was likely unaware of the contents of the luggage, and therefore have not charged or arrested him. The components used to manufacture the IED, which officials described as a “high-end military-grade explosive,” originated in Turkey and were transported to Australia via air cargo. This development prompted officials to enhance security measures employed to screen cargo aircraft.

LPZZ/Portugal Planned strike action by Portuguese immigration officers on 24 and 25 August 2017 may cause delays entering/exiting.

OTZZ/Qatar It had been reported that Bahrain and UAE authorities had lifted the ban on Qatar registered aircraft using their airspace, but this has been denied by both authorities and the ban still exists. Qatar aircraft have been using airspace above international waters which is managed by GCAA UAE but not airspace above their territory.

KTEB/Teterboro has a new RNAV SID – The Ruudy 6 – effective from August 17th, in response to ATC concerns over pilot deviations – 112 reports filed – on the previous version of the SID.

HSZZ/South Sudan The FAA has extended the warning on South Sudanese airspace for another year. Review the full page at http://safeairspace.net/information/south-sudan/

KZZZ/USA The FAA has issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) – operators with aircraft equipped with ADS-B out systems and meeting specific altitude equipment requirements may no longer need to go through the lengthy and challenging RVSM approval process. Comments due by 06SEP. ADS-B will be mandatory in most US Airspace by Jan 2020.

WIHH/Jakarta Halim The Indonesian government has announced it has decided to transfer all Jakarta outbound Hajj flights from Jakarta Halim to Jakarta Soekarno-Hatta Airport effective immediately. A statement issued by the Ministry of Transportation said it had taken the decision after a departing B777 ripped a hole measuring 3x2x0.25m in Halim’s runway on Friday last week. The aircraft was the first of three such flights scheduled to depart from Jakarta Halim during the first day of charters. Repairs to the affected strip took three hours to complete resulting in light delays to other departing flights.

RKSI/Seoul is introducing High Intensity Runway Ops (HIRO) at Incheon, new procedures, review the related AIC here.

VHHH/Hong Kong is now doing the CDM thing (Collaborative Decision Making), so have a read of AIC 12/17 for the details if you’re operating in there and want to know what TOBT and TSAT mean.

Weekly International Ops Bulletin published by FSB for OPSGROUP covering critical changes to Airports, Airspace, ATC, Weather, Safety, Threats, Procedures, Visas. Subscribe to the short free version here, or join thousands of your Pilot/Dispatcher/ATC/CAA/Flight Ops colleagues in OPSGROUP for the full weekly bulletin, airspace warnings, Ops guides, tools, maps, group discussion, Ask-us-Anything, and a ton more! Curious? See what you get. Rated 5 stars by 125 reviews.

 

Here’s why North Korean missiles are now a real threat to Civil Aviation

  • July 2017: First launches of ICBM’s from North Korea
  • Western portion of Japanese airspace is a new risk area
  • New OPSGROUP guidance to Members, Note 30: Japanese Missile risk

The North Korean game has changed. Even if aircraft operators stopped flying through the Pyongyang FIR last year, nobody really thought there was much of a tangible risk. The chances of a missile actually hitting an aircraft seemed slim, and any discussion on the subject didn’t last long.

Things look different now. In July, the DPRK tested two Hwasong-14 Intercontinental missiles (the July 4th one is above), the first ICBM’s successfully launched from North Korea. ICBM’s are larger, and fly further, than the other missiles we’ve previously seen. Both of these landed in the Sea of Japan, well inside the Fukuoka Flight Information Region (Japanese airspace), and significantly, at least one did not re-enter the atmosphere intact – meaning that a debris field of missile fragments passed through the airspace, not just one complete missile.

We drew a map, with our best estimates of the landing positions of all launches in the last year that ended in Japanese airspace. The results are quite clear:


View large image

Zooming in even further, we can see each of the estimated landing sites. It is important to note that the landing positions vary in the degree of accuracy with which it is possible to estimate them. The highest accuracy is for the 28JUL17 landing of the Hwasong-14 ICBM, thanks to tracking by the Japanese Defence Force and US STRATCOM, as well as visual confirmation from land in Japan. The remaining positions are less precise, but in an overall view, the area affected is quite well defined – south of AVGOK and north of KADBO. In 2017, there have been 6 distinct missile landings in this area. The primary airways affected are B451 and R211, as shown on the chart.


View large image

So, in a very specific portion of Japanese airspace, there have been regular splashdowns of North Korean missiles. As highlighted by the Air France 293 coverage, this area is crossed by several airways in regular use, predominantly by Japan-Europe flights using the Russia route.

Determining Risk

The critical question for any aircraft operator is whether there is a clear risk from these missiles returning to earth through the airspace in which we operate. Take these considerations into account:

The regularity and range of the launches are increasing. In 2015, there were 15 launches in total, of short-range ballistic and sub-launched missiles. In 2016, there were 24 launches, almost all being medium-range. In 2017, there have been 18 so far, with the first long-range missiles.

– In 2016, international aviation solved the problem by avoiding the Pyongyang FIR. This is no longer sufficient. The landing sites of these missiles have moved east, and there is a higher likelihood of a splashdown through Japanese airspace than into North Korea.

– Almost all launches are now in an easterly direction from North Korea. The launch sites are various, but the trajectory is programmed with a landing in the Sea of Japan. From North Korea’s perspective, this provides a sufficiently large area to avoid a missile coming down on land in foreign territory.

– The most recent ICBM failed on re-entry, breaking up into many fragmented pieces, creating a debris field. At about 1515Z on the 28th July, there was a large area around the R211 airway that would have presented a real risk to any aircraft there. Thankfully, there were none – although the  Air France B777 had passed through some minutes before.

– Until 2014, North Korea followed a predictable practice of notifying all missile launches to the international community. ICAO and state agencies had time to produce warnings and maps of the projected splashdown area. Now, none of the launches are notified.

– Not all launches are detected by surrounding countries or US STRATCOM. The missile flies for about 35 minutes before re-entry. Even with an immediate detection, it’s unlikely that the information would reach the Japanese radar controller in time to provide any alert to enroute traffic. Further, even with the knowledge of a launch, traffic already in the area has no avoiding option, given the large area that the missile may fall in.

Can a falling missile hit an aircraft?

What are the chances? Following the AFR293 report on July 28, the media has favoured the “billions to one” answer.

We don’t think it’s quite as low.

First of all, that “one” is actually “six” – the number of North Korean missiles landing in the AVGOK/KADBO area in 2017. Considering that at least one of them, and maybe more, broke up on re-entry, that six becomes a much higher number.

Any fragment of reasonable size hitting a tailplane, wing, or engine as the aircraft is in cruise at 450 knots creates a significant risk of loss of control of the aircraft. How many fragments were there across the six launches? Maybe as high as a hundred pieces, maybe even more.

The chances of a missile, or part of it, striking the aircraft are not as low as it may initially appear. Given that all these re-entries are occurring in quite a focused area, prudence dictates considering avoiding the airspace.

What did we learn from MH17?

Whenever we discuss missiles and overflying civil aircraft in the same paragraph,  the valuable lessons from MH17 must be remembered. In the weeks and months leading up to the shooting down of the 777 over Ukraine, there were multiple clues to the threat before the event happened.

Of greatest relevance was that State Authorities did not make clear the risk, and that even though five or six airlines decided to avoid Ukrainian airspace, most other operators did not become aware of the real risk level until after the event.

Our mission at Flight Service Bureau is to make sure all aircraft operators, crews, and dispatchers have the data they need to make a fully informed decision on whether to continue flying western Japan routes, or to avoid them.

Guidance for Aircraft Operators

Download OPSGROUP Note to Members #30: Japan Missile risk (public version here)

Review the map above to see the risk area as determined by the landing sites in 2017.

Consider rerouting to remain over the Japanese landmass or east of it. It is unlikely that North Korea would risk or target a landing of any test launch onto actual Japanese land.

Check routings carefully for arrivals/departures to Europe from Japan, especially if planning airways R211 or B451. Consider the previous missile landing sites in your planning.

– Monitor nti.org for the most recent launches, as well as flightservicebureau.org and safeairspace.net.

OPSGROUP members will be updated with any significant additions or updates to this Note through member mail and/or weekly newsletter.

References

– Nuclear Threat Initiative – nti.org

– Opsgroup Note to members #30 – Public version

OPSGROUP – Membership available here.

– Weekly International Ops Bulletin published by FSB for OPSGROUP covering critical changes to Airports, Airspace, ATC, Weather, Safety, Threats, Procedures, Visas. Subscribe to the short free version here, or join thousands of Pilot/Dispatcher/ATC/CAA/Flight Ops colleagues in OPSGROUP for the full weekly bulletin, airspace warnings, Ops guides, tools, maps, group discussion, Ask-us-Anything, and a ton more. Curious? See what you get. Rated 5 stars by 125 reviews.

– Larger area map of Japan airspace risk 2017

– Contact team@fsbureau.org with any comments or questions.

New overflight charges for Kabul FIR

Effective August 1st, the new charge for overflying the Kabul FIR is a flat fee of $700 USD.

Previously, the charge was $400 USD. The Afghanistan Civil Aviation Authority (ACAA) has determined the increase was necessary to support the additional infrastructure costs now that it manages its own ATC.

The fee applies to all civil flight operations using the FIR to transit enroute, regardless of aircraft size or distance flown.

BGSF/Sondrestrom to shut on August 27th

For NAT Ops on Sunday August 27th, note that BSGF/Sondrestrom will be closed to all traffic, as they are upgrading infrastructure. Sundays in Greenland see most airports closed in any case, but the option of paying $1000 or so to have them open for you is normally there. On this date,  BGSF won’t be, which may affect your diversion options.

They do say that if there’s an emergency, call them on +299 52 42 27 to determine availability.

03AUG: New overflight fees Kabul FIR, Venezuela airspace risk – brink of civil war? Weekly Ops Briefing

Weekly International Ops Bulletin published by FSB for OPSGROUP covering critical changes to Airports, Airspace, ATC, Weather, Safety, Threats, Procedures, Visas. Subscribe to the short free version here, or join thousands of your Pilot/Dispatcher/ATC/CAA/Flight Ops colleagues in OPSGROUP for the full weekly bulletin, airspace warnings, Ops guides, tools, maps, group discussion, Ask-us-Anything, and a ton more! Curious? See what you get. Rated 5 stars by 125 reviews.

 

RJZZ/Japan The frequency of North Korean missile launches that end with a splashdown in the Fukuoka FIR is of concern. Last weekend, one such missile came close to civil traffic, and this is not the first such event. We are preparing a summary for operators, and would request wider reader input on this. Has your operation/airline/authority made any changes recently to operations in the western portion of the Fukuoka FIR in Japan? Talk to us at bulletin@fsbureau.org.

BGSF/Sondrestrom For NAT Ops on Sunday August 27th, note that BSGF/Sondrestrom will be closed to all traffic, as they are upgrading infrastructure. Sundays in Greenland see most airports closed in any case, but the option of paying $1000 or so to have them open for you is normally there. On this date,  BGSF won’t be, which may affect your diversion options. They do say that if there’s an emergency, call them on +299 52 42 27 to determine availability.

RJZZ/Japan As of 1800 local time (0900 UTC) on August 3, Typhoon Noru was located approximately 350nm east-northeast of Kadena Air Force Base, Japan, and was moving in a northwesterly direction at a speed of approximately 8 knots. At that point, Noru was posting maximum sustained winds of 80 knots with gusts up to 105 knots. Noru is expected to make landfall after 48 hours in southern Japan. Southern parts of South Korea, including the port city of Busan, will also likely experience torrential rainfall, which could trigger flooding and landslides.

LFLL/Lyon has some fuel supply issues ongoing, advising tankering where possible.

FAZZ/South Africa The U.S. Mission to South Africa advises travellers to exercise caution when arranging ground transportation from OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg to hotels, guest houses, and residences. Numerous U.S. citizens and other travellers have been robbed at gun point while traveling from the Airport to their place of lodging in what are known as ‘follow home’ robberies. In some instances, U.S. citizens have been injured or shot at during these robberies.

RPLL/Manila Increasing levels of reports of laser lights within 10nm of the airport. [more in Aireport]

ZYHB/Taiping No overnight parking for Business or General Aviation due to parking until 30SEP. [more in Aireport]

SPIM/Lima Volcano eruptions from Mount Sabancaya continue to create airspace warnings up to FL250.

FOOL/Libreville Will be closed overnight 2300-0900Z until August 12th. [more in Aireport]

LIZZ/Italy Baggage handlers at Milan’s Malpensa Airport (LIMC/MXP) and Linate Airport (LIML/LIN) staged a last-minute strike on August 1. The handlers apparently warned the airport operator the day prior, although airport officials claim they did not know ahead of time. The strike caused significant delays for passengers.

UMMS/Minsk, Belarus Will be closed for runway maintenance at various times overnight until the end of August.

LGGG/Athens FIR Strike action planned for Air Traffic Safety Personnel (ATSEP) until 05Aug. Emergency frequencies will remain uninterrupted, although the authorities advise caution as “problems to systems may arise affecting communication, navigation and surveillance (CNS) services” during this period. Probably not too much effect.

LTBA/Istanbul Ataturk The airport is balancing “Supply and Demand.”  Here’s the rundown:
– New seasonal charter and cargo flights to land will not be accepted.
– Technical landings and diversions will not be accepted (unless you’re stationed there).
– Business flights are allowed, as long as the hourly flight limits haven’t been exceeded.
– Flights for MX are allowed to LTBA, but you’ll need to get your slot well in advance.
– Make sure you have a valid slot, they’ll reject your plan if not.
– If you have a permit prior to 24JUL, you’ll be accepted. [more in Aireport]

EETN/Tallinn PPR required for all parking needs over 3 hours. Get in contact at ad.apron.control@tll.aero until the end of August. [more in Aireport]

KZZZ/United States The TSA has announced that travelers will be required to separate more electronic devices from their carry-on baggage when passing through security screening points at U.S. airports. Currently, travelers are only required to take out laptop computers from their carry-on luggage for separate screening; under the new regulations, all devices larger than a mobile phone — including tablets and e-readers — will need to be placed in their own bins to be screened separately. The regulations are already in effect as part of a pilot program at 10 U.S. airports and are expected to be rolled out to facilities across the country in the coming months. The enhanced measures will not affect travelers who are enrolled in pre-check security programs.

FOZZ/Gabon New phone numbers for ANAC- +241 1 44 56 54, and +241 1 44 56 58.

ZKZZ/North Korea On August 2, the U.S. Department of State issued a Travel Alert for North Korea, which reads in part as follows: “The Secretary of State published a Notice on Wednesday, August 2, 2017 that will restrict the use of U.S. passports to travel into, in, or through North Korea/the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), effective Friday, September 1, 2017. The Secretary has authorized the restriction due to the serious and mounting risk of arrest and long-term detention of U.S. citizens under North Korea’s system of law enforcement. Persons who wish to travel to North Korea on a U.S. passport must obtain a special passport validation under 22 C.F.R. 51.64, and such validations will be granted only under very limited circumstances. The Department of State will publish information on how to apply for a passport with a special validation on travel.state.gov when OMB approval is effective. Persons currently in North Korea on a U.S. passport should depart North Korea before the travel restriction enters into effect on Friday, September 1, 2017”

EISN/Shannon FIR The introduction of direct routings in the lower FIR was planned for 14SEP but has been delayed to 12OCT (maybe longer).

YZZZ/Australia Security procedures at Australian airports have been tightened, with pictures of huge lineups in the media. This follows a foiled attack plot last week. Sydney is the largest delay location.

 

 

Weekly International Ops Bulletin published by FSB for OPSGROUP covering critical changes to Airports, Airspace, ATC, Weather, Safety, Threats, Procedures, Visas. Subscribe to the short free version here, or join thousands of your Pilot/Dispatcher/ATC/CAA/Flight Ops colleagues in OPSGROUP for the full weekly bulletin, airspace warnings, Ops guides, tools, maps, group discussion, Ask-us-Anything, and a ton more! Curious? See what you get. Rated 5 stars by 125 reviews.

 

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